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Comprehensive conflict minerals checklist


Conflict minerals are natural resources that are extracted from conflict areas and used to finance armed conflict or other forms of violence. These minerals include tin, tungsten, tantalum, and gold, which are often found in electronics, jewelry, and other products.


The risk of non-compliance with regulations related to conflict minerals is that companies may be contributing to human rights abuses and funding armed conflict in conflict areas. This can have negative consequences for a company's reputation and can also result in legal and financial risks. For example, companies may face fines and penalties for violating laws and regulations related to conflict minerals, and they may also face boycotts and other forms of consumer backlash. Additionally, companies that are not compliant with conflict minerals regulations may find it more difficult to secure contracts and business partnerships, as many organizations are now requiring their suppliers to demonstrate responsible sourcing practices.


Regulation in the US

There are several laws and regulations that govern the use of conflict minerals. In the United States, the most relevant law is the Dodd-Frank Wall Street Reform and Consumer Protection Act, which requires companies to disclose their use of conflict minerals in their products. The law also requires companies to conduct due diligence to determine the origin of the minerals used in their products and to report this information to the Securities and Exchange Commission (SEC).


The SEC is responsible for enforcing the conflict minerals provisions of the Dodd-Frank Act. This includes reviewing and approving companies' conflict minerals reports, conducting audits and investigations, and taking enforcement action against companies that violate the law. In addition to the SEC, other federal agencies, such as the Department of Commerce and the Office of the Comptroller of the Currency, also have roles in enforcing conflict minerals regulations.


Regulation in the EU

In the European Union, the main law governing the use of conflict minerals is the European Union Conflict Minerals Regulation. This regulation requires companies to conduct due diligence on their supply chains to ensure that they are not using conflict minerals and to report on their efforts to the European Commission. The regulation applies to all companies that manufacture or import products containing conflict minerals, regardless of where they are located.


The European Commission is responsible for enforcing the EU Conflict Minerals Regulation. This includes reviewing and approving companies' reports, conducting audits and investigations, and taking enforcement action against companies that violate the law. The European Union member states also have a role in enforcing the regulation, as they are responsible for implementing and enforcing the provisions of the law within their own countries.


Ensuring compliance

A conflict minerals checklist is a tool that can help companies ensure that their supply chain is free of minerals that are sourced from conflict areas. This type of checklist typically includes a series of questions that a company can use to assess the origin and sourcing of the minerals in its products.

Here is a sample conflict minerals checklist that a company could use:

  1. Does the company have a policy in place to avoid sourcing minerals from conflict areas?

  2. Has the company conducted due diligence to determine the origin of the minerals used in its products?

  3. Does the company have a system in place to track the origin of the minerals used in its products throughout the supply chain?

  4. Does the company have a process for verifying the accuracy of the information provided by its suppliers regarding the origin of the minerals used in its products?

  5. Does the company have a mechanism in place for addressing any potential conflicts of interest or concerns regarding the sourcing of the minerals used in its products?

  6. Does the company have a plan in place to respond to any incidents or reports of conflict minerals being used in its products?

  7. Does the company have a policy in place to encourage its suppliers to adopt responsible sourcing practices for conflict minerals?

  8. Does the company regularly review and update its conflict minerals policy and procedures to ensure compliance with relevant laws and regulations?

Overall, a conflict minerals checklist can be an effective tool for companies to use to ensure that they are not contributing to human rights abuses or funding armed conflict through the use of conflict minerals in their products. It can also help companies protect their reputation and avoid potential legal and reputational risks associated with the use of conflict minerals.



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